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20130228
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
officials are trying to find out who made the decision to lock on. now, the u.s. state department spokesperson expressed her concern over the incident. >> actions such as this escalate tensions and increase the risk of an incident or a miscalculation, and they could undermine peace, stability, and economic growth in this vital region. so we are concerned about it. >> u.s. officials have been increasingly uneasy about rising tensions in the area. >>> military analysts are trying to figure out what the chinese are trying to do. bonji ohara is a former navy captain with japan's self-defense forces. he says the chinese sent a clear message. >> it is a serious thing. if the radar is the fire-control radar, can control the weapon, usually a battlhipas that kind of radar, one is searching radar, for navigation. one is for the targeting, control weapon radar. this is the fc radar. this time chinese side used this fc radar. it means they showed to the ship they have the intention to attack the japanese ship. so it is very serious and danger. i think the -- there are two ssib scenarios one
." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. mmy, bat, nuggets and all your favorite animated characters are auditioning, and you're the judge. so plug into pbskidsgo.org and play to decide who has what it takes. wait, wait, jess, don't leave. i'll help you out here. pull! (glass breaking) cut! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. worries about political gridlock, in italy and in washington, cause investors to dump stocks. it's the worst day for wall street since the november elections. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. with $85 billion in federal spending cuts just days away, we talk with congresswoman cathy mcmorris rodgers. >> susie: and the man who founded barnes and noble wants to buy his bookstores back, but he has no interest in the company's electronic book reader b&n's nook business. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: a sharp sell off on wall street today, as stocks suffered their biggest drop since november. italian and american politics put investors in
explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad mortgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if we sit together and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking
and the technology industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is going to try to capture those markets. >> they want to continue to be a hardware player, but
agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. mmy, bat, nuggets and all your favorite animated characters are auditioning, and you're the judge. so plug into pbskidsgo.org and play to decide who has what it takes. wait, wait, jess, don't leave. i'll help you out here pull! (glass breaking) cut! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. office depot and office max could be the next big wall street merger. what this year's mergers means for the markets. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. dell's financial outlook in the spotlight today not only because it reported a big drop in sales and profits, but also more questions on how founder michael dell will take his company private. >> tom: and president obama makes another push to avoid government spending cuts as deficit watchdogs roll out a plan to duce government debt. >> susie: we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r." hope and optimism here on wall street today; investors are buying up stocks as a wave of deals sweeps through corporate ameri
of the market-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agen and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> rorter: s&p pointout cou rulings he diissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product stoc
the reigns then had quite a long struggle. i think part of the whole reason that the u.s., i'm sort of an amateur student of the u.s. automobile industry. i think part of the reason that it ran into trouble was way before the 1970s. it was because the founders of those companies had relinquished the reign reins to businesspeople, not product people. >> rose: buzz as soon as you say that, i would make this observation. look what happened to ford. >> yes. >> rose: c.e.o. of ford. >> yes, yeah. >> rose: -- grew newspaper the car business, was not an engineer but was a superb manager. and grea sensibily for product. and i think-- . >> rose: yeah. >> and i think that's the element that gets missed a lot of the time. in these management turnovers. and particularly for technology company. you absolutely have to have as the guiding force of an abiding enduring technology company, a person or people at the helm who have products in their dna. >>os yeah. >> who love, who are crazed by the idea of making that thing better. >> better. >> the best. or making it better or the best or have this in
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)